Unlike motor vehicle drivers or motorcycle riders, bicyclists won’t be tested on the rules of the road before they mount their bikes and start off.

This can lead to some rules being a little unclear for riders and drivers.

Children cyclists

Most kids learn to ride a bike between the ages of three and eight. Children are encouraged to ride their bicycles on the sidewalks because of their small size and the likelihood that they may take a tumble.

Most parents would prefer that their child falls down on a sidewalk, rather than in the road, where a car might not see them.

Adult cyclists

Adult cyclists are encouraged to ride on the road and even have a right to it. This can cause some issues because adult bicycles — like children — still can’t be seen very easily by motorists. Likewise, they are also put in peril if they do fall while riding in the street. It’s clear that no matter the age, size or experience level of the cyclist, motorized vehicles still pose a deadly threat.

However, it’s unfair and unsafe to limit a bicyclist to the sidewalk. This poses a deadly threat to pedestrians.

Bike lanes

One of the most common solutions to all this is dedicated bike lanes. Dedicated bike lanes offer the exclusivity of the sidewalk while still lending bicyclists the roads they’re entitled to.

Yet, there aren’t nearly enough of them and they don’t form comprehensive routes in most cities. A cyclist in a bicycle lane also still faces the risk of a parked car door opening up in front of them.

If you or a loved one is hurt in a bicycle accident, try to collect as much information at the scene before seeking legal counsel to learn more about your options for medical compensation.